Bathymetric and terminus evolution using Remote Sensing - Research - Geography - University of Canterbury - New Zealand

Bathymetric and terminus evolution as determined by remote-sensing techniques: Tasman Glacier, New Zealand

Supported by Glacier Explorers

Surveying on Tasman LakeGlobal glacier recession is increasing the number of glaciers that terminate in proglacial lakes, yet knowledge about the processes that drive ice-berg calving are still poorly understood. This knowledge-gap is in part due to the challenge of obtaining good data sets in a highly dynamic and dangerous environment.  We are using emerging remote technologies, in the form of a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry, and Structure from Motion (SfM) to characterise terminus morphology, to better understand relationships between lake growth and terminus evolution.

In addition to learning more about the processes operating in this dynamic environment, our research also helps to inform local tourism company Glacier Explorers about the changing characteristics of Tasman Lake which can assist them with day-to-day operational decisions.

Publications:

Purdie, H., Bealing, P., Tidey, E. & Gomez, C. in preparation. Use of a remote-controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry at the terminus of a calving glacier: Tasman Glacier, New Zealand. Journal of Glaciology.

Purdie, H., Bealing, P., Tidey, E. & Gomez, C. 2015. Bathymetric and terminus evolution as determined by remote-sensing techniques: Tasman Glacier, New Zealand. New Zealand Snow and Ice Research Group Annual Workshop. Cass, Canterbury, 2-4 July.

Use of remote controlled boatPurdie, H., Bealing, P., Tidey, E. & Gomez, C. 2015. Use of a remote-controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry at the terminus of a lake-calving glacier: Tasman Glacier, New Zealand. New Zealand Region of the Australasian Hydrographic Society Annual Seminar: Our seas and oceans - still to be explored and charted. Wellington, 22 June.

Staff involved